Summertime & the Living is Easy, but . . . by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Summertime & the living is easy, but what you don’t know CAN hurt you!

A sun-kissed bronze tan looks great, but it results in skin damage: wrinkles, brown skin discolorations, dull-looking skin, and potentially even skin cancer.

If you want healthy, younger-looking skin, and who doesn’t, you must practice good sun sense; because without it no other skin care product will matter.

The Sun Sense Essentials

      There is no such thing as a safe tan. Whether it is from the sun or a tanning bed the

result is still damaging.

*        UVB rays from the sun cause sunburn.

*        The primary cause of skin cancer is UVA rays from the sun. They also cause wrinkles and a weakened immune system. Because you don’t feel them they are called the “silent killers.”  UVA rays even penetrate through clear glass windows that do not have a UV coating.

*        Your skin is in jeopardy of being damaged even on a cloudy or hazy day since all the sun’s rays are present.

*       Sitting in the shade or wearing a hat only protects against a portion of the sun’s rays.

*        Your skin gets a double dose of exposure from surrounding surfaces such as water, sand, cement, and grass because they reflect the rays from the ground to your skin.

*        Altitude is a sun enhancer:  For every 1,000-foot increase in altitude, the sun’s potency increases by 4%.

*       A product’s SPF (Sun Protection Factor) number is a basic indicator of how long you can stay in the sun before getting burned.

*        While SPF is important, it’s only a measurement of sunburn (UVB) protection. You also need to protect your skin from the sun’s UVA rays as well.  Make sure your sunscreen contains the active ingredients that provide the necessary UVA protection. The active ingredients to look for are either zinc oxide or titanium dioxide,
avobenzone (may also be listed as butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane), Mexoryl SX (ecamsule), or Tinosorb.

*        Even if you’re using a sunscreen with an SPF 50 or greater, it still has limitations and can let approximately 3% of UV rays penetrate your skin.

*       No sunscreen provides 100% protection. So sitting directly in the sun, even with sunscreen on, is unwise.

*       For best results, apply sunscreen at least 15 to 20 minutes before sun exposure.

*       Apply sunscreen generously.

*        Re-apply after swimming.

*        Layering sunscreen products is beneficial. While the two sunscreens do not add up to one SPF number, you are getting more protection than just using one product.

*       Sunscreens that only use titanium dioxide and zinc oxide as the active ingredient are completely non-irritating and are best for sensitive skin, those with rosacea, or for use on babies and children.

*       Any part of your body exposed to the sun, such as your hands, neck, ears, and chest, must be protected. Aging skin on your body is no different than your face. The best way to prevent sun damage is the daily use of sunscreen.

It’s up to you to protect your youthful good looks, so learn more about what the sun is doing to your skin and how you can prevent it.

Madeleine Arena

www.tscsource.com

madeleine@tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the chapter on skin care which appears in the book,

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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VITAMIN C – The Big Gun in Any Anti-Aging Arsenal

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

The bad news is that free-radical damage from the environment is inescapable. This daily assault on our skin can cause premature aging. The good news is research has shown that topical vitamin C can help fortify the skin against this onslaught. How? By providing powerful antioxidant protection, Vitamin C shields the skin from free radical damage.

(Dermatological Surgery, 2008 & Dermatology Research and Practice, 2012)

Adding a well-formulated vitamin C product to your daily skincare regime, can afford you a variety of benefits that can help keep your skin looking younger, longer.

Vitamin C, whether blended with other beneficial ingredients or in a concentrated treatment, can treat multiple skincare concerns.

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Vitamin C can:

  • Reduce the appearance of brown spots.
  • Firm the skin by stimulating collagen production.
  • Reduce inflammation and irritation, both of which can trigger additional skin damage.
  • Improve the skin’s natural healing response, which helps fade post-breakout red marks.
  • Increase the effectiveness of your sunscreen and boost your skins defense against UV exposure.

(Dermatological Surgery 2008, & Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2012 & The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 2010)

The most commonly used form of vitamin C in skin care products is Ascorbic acid—also known as L-ascorbic acid. It has the most research of any form of vitamin C when it comes to benefits for skin. It is equally powerful when mixed with other antioxidants, or when used alone in higher concentrations. Ascorbic acid concentrations of 15%, 20% or greater can be used for treating extra-stubborn problems. (Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2008 & Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, 2012).

It’s important for you to know that there isn’t just one “best” form of vitamin C. There are, however a few derivitives that research has demonstrated are the most stable and effective. Other effective forms include sodium ascorbyl phosphate, ascorbyl palmitate, tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate, and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate. While there is less supporting research on these derivatives than ascorbic acid the research that does exist is positive.

The range of benefits for these forms of vitamin C includes repair and protection from free- radical damage, skin firming, and the improvement of skin tone. When added to a blend of other proven antioxidants and cell-communicating ingredients these vitamin C derivatives enhance the formulation. Look for products that include these with ingredients such as green tea, grape seed extract, Resveratrol, peptides, and niacinamide.

All antioxidants, including vitamin C, are susceptible to destabilizing when exposed to air and light (Skin Research and Technology, 2008). To maximize the benefits of your vitamin and anti-oxidant treatments, as well as protecting your investment in those products, choose only those products packaged so that their ingredients maintain their stability. Look for opaque bottles or tubes, air-restrictive bottles, and pumps.

There’s no doubt; vitamin C is a powerful tool in your anti-aging arsenal. However, research is clear that using a range of beneficial ingredients is always best for keeping skin at its healthiest. Make vitamin C a part of a regimen that includes a daily broad-spectrum sunscreen SFP 30, an exfoliant, and a non-irritating products that contain a blend of antioxidants, skin-repairing agents, and cell-communicating ingredients.

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label skin and hair care products for the trade. Madeleine can be reached through her website – www.tscsource.com



 

Madeleine@tscsource.com

Treating PUFFY EYES Needs More Than Hope in a Jar by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

Madeleine - 111809

by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Almost all of us have woken up with swollen, puffy eyes that diminish as the morning goes by. There are an unlucky few whose puffy eyes are worse in the morning, and then never go away. Puffy eyes are one of the major skin care complaints; and since it is so common, nearly every skin-care company sells products claiming to treat chronic or occasional puffy eyes.

The question is can an eye cream, gel, or serum, eliminate puffy eyes? Regretfully, the answer is no. But don’t be discouraged, because there are things you can do to help minimize puffy eyes once you know what causes them.

Puffy eyes can be caused by one, or a combination of the following reasons: fluid retention, allergic reactions, inflamed and irritated skin, or prominent fat pads surrounding the eye area.

These are the most common causes of puffy eyes and what you can do to minimize them:

  1. Sleep Position

Fluid collects in the tissue around your eyes when you sleep with you head flat. Sleeping with your head slightly elevated, making sure that your neck is properly supported, can help prevent fluid retention in the eye area. Gentle fingertip massage around the eye area when you get up can also help relieve this swelling.

  1. Diet

Alcohol consumption and a diet high in salt not only increases puffiness around the eyes, but also cause it to linger throughout the day. This is an easy fix. Moderate (or eliminate) your intake of alcohol, sodium, and processed foods. Add anti-inflammatory foods to your diet (e.g., fruits, vegetables, salmon); and drink plenty of water.

  1. Contact Lenses

Contact lenses, even under the best of circumstances, can cause irritation and swelling. Ensure you are wearing the most comfortable type of contacts for your vision correction. Follow your eye-care provider’s exact instructions for cleansing, wear, and disposal. Keep your eyes lubricated with the appropriate eye drops.

  1. Allergies

Exposure to allergens, either in the air or by rubbing your eyes, can cause redness and lasting puffiness. Avoid touching your eyes, because rubbing not only pulls at the skin, and encourages sagging, but also increases inflammation, making puffiness worse. Talk to your physician about taking an antihistamine or using anti-allergy eye drops to control your allergy symptoms. Applying a cool (but not ice-cold) compress to your eyes also can help.

  1. Dry Skin

Dryness around your eyes can contribute to swelling, and make them look wrinkled and tired. A well-formulated moisturizer can make a remarkable difference. Remember to protect eye-area skin daily with a product rated SPF 30 or greater.

  1. Makeup Residue

Makeup, when left on overnight, can cause irritation, which is a sure way to cause puffy eyes. Thoroughly remove your makeup every night. Start with a gentle, fragrance-free eye make-up remover, (one that’s also colorant-free is best for the eyes). Finish with a mild, fragrance-free cleanser for your face, neck and décolleté.

  1. Crying

Make no mistake, when the tears start to flow, puffiness follows. Why? The physical act of crying causes inflammation around the eyes. That irritation, plus a person’s natural tendency to rub and wipe their eyes while crying, leads to puffiness. There’s no remedy for this, and remember the longer you cry, the worse the puffiness.

  1. Exposure to Irritants

Irritants of any kind, especially those in your eye make-up, cause irritation and inflammation, which almost guarantee puffy eyes. Ingredients like menthol, camphor, alcohol, essential oils, fragrant plant extracts, or any kind of fragrance shouldn’t come anywhere near your eyes.

  1. Fat Pads

For some people, puffy eyes are genetic. Typically, this results from overly large fat pads around the eyes; or because over time the fat pads have bulged through the facial muscles and begin to sag. In this case, the only way to solve the problem is with cosmetic surgery.

  1. Sun Damage

If you suffer from puffy eyes, your eyes are even more susceptible to the negative impact of unprotected sun exposure. The resulting sun damage causes the skin around your eyes to lose its elasticity, which in turn allows more fluid to accumulate in the area. In addition, sagging skin just tends to look puffier. Wearing a sunscreen every day is crucial. Be aware that, many eye creams don’t contain sunscreen.

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label skin and hair care products for the trade. Madeleine can be reached through her website – www.tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the Skin Care chapter in the book

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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ANTI-AGING SKIN CARE MEANS MORE THAN A PRETTY FACE by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

Madeleine - 111809

by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

It’s a fact of life that wrinkles, crepiness, and discolored skin appear sooner on areas that haven’t been routinely protected from the sun with a broad-spectrum sunscreen. This is especially true for the neglected neck, chest and décolleté since most of us take special care of the face. As a result, over the years the contrast between the skin on the face, and the skin on neck, chest and décolleté becomes striking; and is the most obvious sign of aging skin that can give away your age in the same way your hands can. That’s why I believe skin care needs to start at our chests.

There are various reasons why the neck and décolleté shows the signs of aging sooner than the face.

First, is sun damage. The chest and neck skin often burns before the face.

In addition, the skin on the neck is naturally thinner than the skin on the face, therefore, the damage from UV rays is more extensive and severe.

Last but not least, the muscles in the neck area are relatively weak. Weak muscles combined with chronic sun exposure cause multiple horizontal lines, sagging and drooping of the neck skin as a person ages.

Given this, it’s no wonder cosmetics counters are packed with an array of creams and treatments targeting these areas. Buying a separate neck, chest, or décolleté cream is a waste of your money. These “specialized” products are rarely well-formulated, and they almost always are overpriced. In addition, they are unnecessary because the anti-aging product you use for your face will work beautifully, if it’s well-formulated.

Scientific research has proven that the same effective ingredients will keep the skin anywhere on your body acting and looking young. Gentle cleansing, anti-aging products loaded with antioxidants (such as Vitamin C & E, as well as co-enzyme Q10) skin-repairing ingredients (such as Ceramides, & Hyaluronic Acid), and cell-communicating ingredients (such as Peptides, Retinol, & Linolenic Acid) along with the diligent use of a well-formulated sunscreen will work for your face, as well as your neck, chest, and décolleté. Simply continue their application downward.

Whether you’re treating your face or your neck, chest and décolleté a consistent routine is essential if you want to see results.

Remember the best single step you can take to keep any area of your skin, especially these delicate areas, looking gorgeous for years to come is to always protect them with a generous application of a broad-spectrum sunscreen.

If you do have sun damage in these areas it is treatable. Consult your dermatologist. There are different treatment options available, such as skin lightening products that contain hydroquinone. Creams will only go so far if the sun damage is bad. If creams cannot help you laser treatments may.

Skin is skin, and what works for your face absolutely will work for your neck, chest, and décolleté. There’s no need to buy extra products for signs of aging below the face. As long as you don’t have any specific concerns (like acne, eczema, or rosacea), your facial anti-aging product will keep your neck, chest and décolleté looking healthy and young.

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label skin and hair care products for the trade. Madeleine can be reached through her website – www.tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the Skin Care chapter in the book

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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Natural Beauty Tips for Hair From Grandma’s Kitchen 

After cruising the aisles of the drugstore, don’t forget the kitchen. It is a beauty counter unto itself.

For more beautiful hair:

Although mayonnaise is  often-recommended for conditioning hair, many prefer Olive oil. Heat some extra virgin olive oil in the microwave for 10 seconds and apply to DRY hair. Leave it on for about 10 minutes, then shampoo so you are not left smelling like a salad.

Flat beer. Be sure to use beer that has lost its zing, or else heat fresh beer and allow it to cool. Wash your hair, pour it on, and comb. I guarantee it will not smell after it dries.

37th AFI Life Achievement Award - ArrivalsVinegar is a marvelous rinse. Cider vinegar is good for brunettes, white vinegar for blondes. Add four tablespoons to 16 – 20 ounces of warm water. Then use lots of cool water to remove the salady smell.

Lemons are a blonde’s best friend! The juice of two lemons in two glasses of lukewarm water should do it. If your hair does not tend to be dry, you can skip the rinse and let the sun add some highlights.

Sometimes, those products stored in your kitchen cabinets can do wonders for your hair – and your pocketbook!

Would you like to receive my free booklet “Make-up Do’s and Don’t For Women of a Certain Age?

Just click here.

Does Dry Skin Cause Wrinkles? by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Madeleine - 111809Does Dry Skin Cause Wrinkles?

No. Dry skin does not cause wrinkles. Research has shown that wrinkles and dry skin are not related in terms of cause and effect.

Sun damage is the primary cause of wrinkles. In addition, muscle movement, estrogen loss, and fat depletion also cause wrinkles. Nowhere (outside of ads and product claims) is dry skin ever mentioned as a cause of wrinkles. You may ask, “what about those annoying little “fine, dry lines” most moisturizers claim to eliminate? Realistically, that’s just another way to describe how your skin can look when it’s dry. However, “fine, dry lines” are not the same as wrinkles. Wrinkles don’t go away simply by applying a moisturizer.

If you’re over 35 it’s easy to prove that sun damage is by far the leading cause of wrinkled skin. Simply compare the parts of your body that rarely, if ever, see the sun with the parts of your body exposed to the sun on a daily basis. Look at your backside, inner arms, and abdomen. You may be surprised to see that these areas have minimal to no signs of “aging.” In fact, they are firmer, have more elasticity, and the color of “younger” skin than the sun-exposed areas. Proving just how strongly sun exposure and wrinkles are related.

So why are so many people convinced that dry skin and wrinkles are related? There are two reasons. First is the misinformation distributed by the cosmetics industry; and second is the fact that dry skin looks more wrinkled than skin that isn’t dry. So, it’s not surprising, that wrinkled skin looks better after a moisturizer has been applied.
When skin is dry or dehydrated, any amount of wrinkling or flaws look more exaggerated. Applying a moisturizer will diminish the appearance of wrinkles and can help skin look and act younger, but that is not the same thing as helping skin to repair itself.

Standard, ordinary moisturizers do not have any significant effect on wrinkles. However, using a product that contains state of-the art ingredients will have such an effect. Not all products are created equal. The state-of-the-art ingredients you should look for are Antioxidants, cell-communicating ingredients, and skin-repairing ingredients. Here’s how each one of these critical ingredient categories works:

Antioxidants decrease free-radical damage. They also reduce inflammation, which causes collagen to break down and negatively impacts the skin cell’s DNA structure. When contained in an effective sunscreen, antioxidants also help your skin defend itself against the #1 cause of aging, the sun.
Cell-communicating ingredients not only work to “tell” damaged cells to start acting more like normal, younger, healthier cells; but also help skin cells form in a healthy, “younger” way.
Skin-repairing ingredients are substances that skin has lost due to sun exposure and external irritants. These repairing ingredients help to fight environmental damage that leads to moisture loss and dull skin causing it to look older than it really is.

Last but definitely not least, it is critically importance to use an effective sunscreen rated SPF 30 or higher 365 days a year. While the topic of sunscreen may not be as interesting as the latest anti-wrinkle miracle, sunscreen is the single most important product to help you prevent premature aging, and resist wrinkles.

To learn what ingredients to look for, read Madeleine’s article,

Navigating the Sea of Skin Care Productshttps://fabulousbeautyblog.wordpress.com

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label

skin and hair care products for the trade.

www.tscsource.com

Her chapter on skin care has been a popular feature in

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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Hand Lifts and Other New Cosmetic Surgery Trends

The “hand lift” might be the hottest new trend in plastic surgery, and if so, you can blame it on selfies! Some camera-conscious women are getting Juvederm injections to smooth out their hands to show off close-ups of their engagement rings. For a temporary fix to plump up or smooth out their skin, or disguise surface veins, they are willing to fork over up to $1,300 for this 5-10 minutes procedure. But hand lifts are hardly the strangest new cosmetic surgery procedure on the menu. Here are seven other plastic surgery trends that might just leave your jaw agape.
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