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Do you Really Need a SKINCARE ROUTINE? Part 2 by Madeleine Arena

Do you Really Need a SKINCARE ROUTINE? Part 2

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Madeleine Arena


The next three important steps in creating an effective skincare routine are to renew, to protect, and to prevent.

Your skin sheds billions of cells every day. However, sun damage, dry skin, oily skin, genetics or a variety of skin disorders can cause the skin’s natural shedding process to slow or stop. Adding an exfoliant as the third step in your regime can help renew your skin, making you look younger.

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For maximum efficacy of steps four (protect) and five (prevent) you’ll need to add products formulated with ingredients that protect from UVA and UVB sun rays, reinforce and maintain the skin’s structure, and restore damaged cells to normal function.

Choose products that contain ingredients from these four essential groups:

1. Broad Spectrum Sunscreens

It’s critical that your daytime moisturizer contain these active ingredients, which will differentiate it from your nighttime moisturizer. The single most important step you can take to prevent pre-mature aging, not to mention preventing skin cancer, is to wear a broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF rating of at least 30. Broad spectrum means that you’re protected from both UVB (burning rays) and UVA (aging rays). Look for these active sunscreen ingredients to ensure you’re getting sufficient UVA protection: Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, Avobenzone, or Tinosorb.

2. Antioxidants

Antioxidants help your skin heal, produce healthy collagen, resist the harmful effects of the environment, reduce inflammation and free radical damage. These ingredients include: various forms of vitamins A, C, and E; Co Enzyme Q-10; superoxide dismutase; glutathione; green tea and grape seed extracts, to name a few. While it’s not always true, in this case, if a little is good, a lot is definitely better, so look for a product that’s rich in these ingredients.

3. Skin-Identical Ingredients

Improve skin texture, retain water, protect from the environment, fight infection, and help repair and maintain the skin’s outer and inner barrier structure. Choose a product that contains some of these ingredients: ceramides, lecithin, glycerin, fatty acids, polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid, collagen, elastin, proteins, amino acids, cholesterol, and glycosaminoglycan.

4. Cell-Communicating Ingredients

Help prevent wrinkles by reducing cellular damage. Cell-communicating ingredients can tell a skin cell to look, act, and behave more like a normal, healthy intact skin cell would. This is a developing area of skin care. Look for products that contain these ingredients: niacinamide, retinol, synthetic peptides, lecithin, and adenosine triphosphate.

 Next month I’ll cover specialized treatments, as well as the specifics of a daily routine.

Madeleine@tscsource.com

http://www.tscsource.com



Madeleine is the author of the skin care chapter published in

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on our Lunch Hour

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Summertime & the Living is Easy, but . . . by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Summertime & the living is easy, but what you don’t know CAN hurt you!

A sun-kissed bronze tan looks great, but it results in skin damage: wrinkles, brown skin discolorations, dull-looking skin, and potentially even skin cancer.

If you want healthy, younger-looking skin, and who doesn’t, you must practice good sun sense; because without it no other skin care product will matter.

The Sun Sense Essentials

      There is no such thing as a safe tan. Whether it is from the sun or a tanning bed the

result is still damaging.

*        UVB rays from the sun cause sunburn.

*        The primary cause of skin cancer is UVA rays from the sun. They also cause wrinkles and a weakened immune system. Because you don’t feel them they are called the “silent killers.”  UVA rays even penetrate through clear glass windows that do not have a UV coating.

*        Your skin is in jeopardy of being damaged even on a cloudy or hazy day since all the sun’s rays are present.

*       Sitting in the shade or wearing a hat only protects against a portion of the sun’s rays.

*        Your skin gets a double dose of exposure from surrounding surfaces such as water, sand, cement, and grass because they reflect the rays from the ground to your skin.

*        Altitude is a sun enhancer:  For every 1,000-foot increase in altitude, the sun’s potency increases by 4%.

*       A product’s SPF (Sun Protection Factor) number is a basic indicator of how long you can stay in the sun before getting burned.

*        While SPF is important, it’s only a measurement of sunburn (UVB) protection. You also need to protect your skin from the sun’s UVA rays as well.  Make sure your sunscreen contains the active ingredients that provide the necessary UVA protection. The active ingredients to look for are either zinc oxide or titanium dioxide,
avobenzone (may also be listed as butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane), Mexoryl SX (ecamsule), or Tinosorb.

*        Even if you’re using a sunscreen with an SPF 50 or greater, it still has limitations and can let approximately 3% of UV rays penetrate your skin.

*       No sunscreen provides 100% protection. So sitting directly in the sun, even with sunscreen on, is unwise.

*       For best results, apply sunscreen at least 15 to 20 minutes before sun exposure.

*       Apply sunscreen generously.

*        Re-apply after swimming.

*        Layering sunscreen products is beneficial. While the two sunscreens do not add up to one SPF number, you are getting more protection than just using one product.

*       Sunscreens that only use titanium dioxide and zinc oxide as the active ingredient are completely non-irritating and are best for sensitive skin, those with rosacea, or for use on babies and children.

*       Any part of your body exposed to the sun, such as your hands, neck, ears, and chest, must be protected. Aging skin on your body is no different than your face. The best way to prevent sun damage is the daily use of sunscreen.

It’s up to you to protect your youthful good looks, so learn more about what the sun is doing to your skin and how you can prevent it.

Madeleine Arena

www.tscsource.com

madeleine@tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the chapter on skin care which appears in the book,

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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VITAMIN C – The Big Gun in Any Anti-Aging Arsenal

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

The bad news is that free-radical damage from the environment is inescapable. This daily assault on our skin can cause premature aging. The good news is research has shown that topical vitamin C can help fortify the skin against this onslaught. How? By providing powerful antioxidant protection, Vitamin C shields the skin from free radical damage.

(Dermatological Surgery, 2008 & Dermatology Research and Practice, 2012)

Adding a well-formulated vitamin C product to your daily skincare regime, can afford you a variety of benefits that can help keep your skin looking younger, longer.

Vitamin C, whether blended with other beneficial ingredients or in a concentrated treatment, can treat multiple skincare concerns.

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Vitamin C can:

  • Reduce the appearance of brown spots.
  • Firm the skin by stimulating collagen production.
  • Reduce inflammation and irritation, both of which can trigger additional skin damage.
  • Improve the skin’s natural healing response, which helps fade post-breakout red marks.
  • Increase the effectiveness of your sunscreen and boost your skins defense against UV exposure.

(Dermatological Surgery 2008, & Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2012 & The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 2010)

The most commonly used form of vitamin C in skin care products is Ascorbic acid—also known as L-ascorbic acid. It has the most research of any form of vitamin C when it comes to benefits for skin. It is equally powerful when mixed with other antioxidants, or when used alone in higher concentrations. Ascorbic acid concentrations of 15%, 20% or greater can be used for treating extra-stubborn problems. (Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2008 & Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, 2012).

It’s important for you to know that there isn’t just one “best” form of vitamin C. There are, however a few derivitives that research has demonstrated are the most stable and effective. Other effective forms include sodium ascorbyl phosphate, ascorbyl palmitate, tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate, and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate. While there is less supporting research on these derivatives than ascorbic acid the research that does exist is positive.

The range of benefits for these forms of vitamin C includes repair and protection from free- radical damage, skin firming, and the improvement of skin tone. When added to a blend of other proven antioxidants and cell-communicating ingredients these vitamin C derivatives enhance the formulation. Look for products that include these with ingredients such as green tea, grape seed extract, Resveratrol, peptides, and niacinamide.

All antioxidants, including vitamin C, are susceptible to destabilizing when exposed to air and light (Skin Research and Technology, 2008). To maximize the benefits of your vitamin and anti-oxidant treatments, as well as protecting your investment in those products, choose only those products packaged so that their ingredients maintain their stability. Look for opaque bottles or tubes, air-restrictive bottles, and pumps.

There’s no doubt; vitamin C is a powerful tool in your anti-aging arsenal. However, research is clear that using a range of beneficial ingredients is always best for keeping skin at its healthiest. Make vitamin C a part of a regimen that includes a daily broad-spectrum sunscreen SFP 30, an exfoliant, and a non-irritating products that contain a blend of antioxidants, skin-repairing agents, and cell-communicating ingredients.

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label skin and hair care products for the trade. Madeleine can be reached through her website – www.tscsource.com



 

Madeleine@tscsource.com

Treating PUFFY EYES Needs More Than Hope in a Jar by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

Madeleine - 111809

by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Almost all of us have woken up with swollen, puffy eyes that diminish as the morning goes by. There are an unlucky few whose puffy eyes are worse in the morning, and then never go away. Puffy eyes are one of the major skin care complaints; and since it is so common, nearly every skin-care company sells products claiming to treat chronic or occasional puffy eyes.

The question is can an eye cream, gel, or serum, eliminate puffy eyes? Regretfully, the answer is no. But don’t be discouraged, because there are things you can do to help minimize puffy eyes once you know what causes them.

Puffy eyes can be caused by one, or a combination of the following reasons: fluid retention, allergic reactions, inflamed and irritated skin, or prominent fat pads surrounding the eye area.

These are the most common causes of puffy eyes and what you can do to minimize them:

  1. Sleep Position

Fluid collects in the tissue around your eyes when you sleep with you head flat. Sleeping with your head slightly elevated, making sure that your neck is properly supported, can help prevent fluid retention in the eye area. Gentle fingertip massage around the eye area when you get up can also help relieve this swelling.

  1. Diet

Alcohol consumption and a diet high in salt not only increases puffiness around the eyes, but also cause it to linger throughout the day. This is an easy fix. Moderate (or eliminate) your intake of alcohol, sodium, and processed foods. Add anti-inflammatory foods to your diet (e.g., fruits, vegetables, salmon); and drink plenty of water.

  1. Contact Lenses

Contact lenses, even under the best of circumstances, can cause irritation and swelling. Ensure you are wearing the most comfortable type of contacts for your vision correction. Follow your eye-care provider’s exact instructions for cleansing, wear, and disposal. Keep your eyes lubricated with the appropriate eye drops.

  1. Allergies

Exposure to allergens, either in the air or by rubbing your eyes, can cause redness and lasting puffiness. Avoid touching your eyes, because rubbing not only pulls at the skin, and encourages sagging, but also increases inflammation, making puffiness worse. Talk to your physician about taking an antihistamine or using anti-allergy eye drops to control your allergy symptoms. Applying a cool (but not ice-cold) compress to your eyes also can help.

  1. Dry Skin

Dryness around your eyes can contribute to swelling, and make them look wrinkled and tired. A well-formulated moisturizer can make a remarkable difference. Remember to protect eye-area skin daily with a product rated SPF 30 or greater.

  1. Makeup Residue

Makeup, when left on overnight, can cause irritation, which is a sure way to cause puffy eyes. Thoroughly remove your makeup every night. Start with a gentle, fragrance-free eye make-up remover, (one that’s also colorant-free is best for the eyes). Finish with a mild, fragrance-free cleanser for your face, neck and décolleté.

  1. Crying

Make no mistake, when the tears start to flow, puffiness follows. Why? The physical act of crying causes inflammation around the eyes. That irritation, plus a person’s natural tendency to rub and wipe their eyes while crying, leads to puffiness. There’s no remedy for this, and remember the longer you cry, the worse the puffiness.

  1. Exposure to Irritants

Irritants of any kind, especially those in your eye make-up, cause irritation and inflammation, which almost guarantee puffy eyes. Ingredients like menthol, camphor, alcohol, essential oils, fragrant plant extracts, or any kind of fragrance shouldn’t come anywhere near your eyes.

  1. Fat Pads

For some people, puffy eyes are genetic. Typically, this results from overly large fat pads around the eyes; or because over time the fat pads have bulged through the facial muscles and begin to sag. In this case, the only way to solve the problem is with cosmetic surgery.

  1. Sun Damage

If you suffer from puffy eyes, your eyes are even more susceptible to the negative impact of unprotected sun exposure. The resulting sun damage causes the skin around your eyes to lose its elasticity, which in turn allows more fluid to accumulate in the area. In addition, sagging skin just tends to look puffier. Wearing a sunscreen every day is crucial. Be aware that, many eye creams don’t contain sunscreen.

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label skin and hair care products for the trade. Madeleine can be reached through her website – www.tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the Skin Care chapter in the book

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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Natural Beauty Tips for Hair From Grandma’s Kitchen 

After cruising the aisles of the drugstore, don’t forget the kitchen. It is a beauty counter unto itself.

For more beautiful hair:

Although mayonnaise is  often-recommended for conditioning hair, many prefer Olive oil. Heat some extra virgin olive oil in the microwave for 10 seconds and apply to DRY hair. Leave it on for about 10 minutes, then shampoo so you are not left smelling like a salad.

Flat beer. Be sure to use beer that has lost its zing, or else heat fresh beer and allow it to cool. Wash your hair, pour it on, and comb. I guarantee it will not smell after it dries.

37th AFI Life Achievement Award - ArrivalsVinegar is a marvelous rinse. Cider vinegar is good for brunettes, white vinegar for blondes. Add four tablespoons to 16 – 20 ounces of warm water. Then use lots of cool water to remove the salady smell.

Lemons are a blonde’s best friend! The juice of two lemons in two glasses of lukewarm water should do it. If your hair does not tend to be dry, you can skip the rinse and let the sun add some highlights.

Sometimes, those products stored in your kitchen cabinets can do wonders for your hair – and your pocketbook!

Would you like to receive my free booklet “Make-up Do’s and Don’t For Women of a Certain Age?

Just click here.

Navigating the Sea of Skin Care Products – Part 2 – How To Choose A Moisturizer by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Winter is almost here, and with it the cold, dry weather that plays havoc on our complexions.  If you suffer from dry skin, and so many of us do, you’ve probably been on a quest to find the one moisturizer that truly works.  Sifting through the myriad of advertising claims on your way to choosing the best product for your needs can be mind boggling.  Once again, I urge you to read the labels, and look for certain key ingredients that are proven to work.

Ingredients To Look For:

Antioxidants – are a group of natural and synthetic ingredients that reduce free-radical and environmental damage.  They’re important because Antioxidants can prevent some of the degenerative effects in skin caused by sun exposure, and can also reduce inflammation within the skin.  Remember that dry skin is caused when the outer layers of the skin lose their ability to maintain normal moisture levels.   Mostly, this is due to sun damage, or by using products that damage the skin’s protective barrier.

The most effective moisturizers are formulated with a cocktail of antioxidants that work together to help your skin.  It’s essential that you choose antioxidants that are contained in packaging that will ensure they stay effective.  That means no see through jars.  Antioxidants break down in the presence of light and air. My Recommended Anti-oxidant ingredients: Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Vitamin C, Green Tea, Resveratrol, Idebenone – a more stable form of Coenzyme Q10, Coenzyme Q10,  Spin Trap (Phenyl Butyl Nitrone),

Skin-identical/skin-repairing ingredients – are the substances that keep skin intact.  These are ingredients that already exist in your skin, and are therefore recognized by your immune system as part of your body.  They are the substances between skin cells (technically referred to as the intercellular matrix) that keep the cells connected, and help maintain the skin’s fundamental external structure.

An intact, stable, healthy, and strong structure is what allows skin to look smooth, soft, moist, supple, and young.  Unfortunately, the external structure of our skin, is easily damaged by the sun, irritation, over cleansing, over scrubbing, climate changes, and skin disorders.

When the skin’s the intercellular matrix breaks down, it results in water loss, flakiness, and a tight, dry-feeling skin.  In order to combat environmental stresses, and have a healthy, youthful appearance, all skin types must maintain, or restore the skin’s intercellular matrix.

Some well-known skin-identical ingredients, are: hyaluronic acid, sodium hyaluronate, cholesterol, ceramides, sodium PCA, amino acids, and fatty acids.  There are too many more to list here.

Emollients are lubricating ingredients that prevent water loss.  They also have a softening, protective, and smoothing effect on the skin. Preventing water loss is critical in maintaining skin’s moisture. Emollients vary in texture, and may be fluid or thick.  Some emollients include, petrolatum, fatty acids such as linoleic acid, glycerin, and fatty alcohols.

Anti-inflammatory ingredients are any ingredients that reduce signs of inflammation, such as swelling, tenderness, pain, itching, or redness. Many antioxidants fall into this category.  A couple of the best known anti-inflammatory ingredients are Bisabolol, and Chamomile.

You now have the information you need to choose the best moisturizer for your dry skin.

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops  private label skin and hair care products for the trade.

Visit her beautiful new website.

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Click on either book cover to place an order.   

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A New Look for Renee Zellweger – Plastic Surgery: Yes or NO?

So much in the news about 45-year-old Renee Zellweger of late, suddenly ushered in after her appearance at the recent 21st annual Elle Women in Hollywood Awards.

TMZ reported: Despite not appearing in a movie since 2010, Renee has definitely been working for the last few years … on her face.

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Is it really anyone else’s business? Well, in my case it became everyone’s business because I wrote a book about my experience. Was I self-conscious and a bit embarrassed? Sure. But I took the plunge and was glad I did. Sometimes honesty pays off.

All this banter abut Renee reminds me of an article titled “Hey, It’s Still Me in Here”, which appeared in the Sunday Style section of the NY Times some years back. I was quoted then about some of the positive and not-so-positive reactions I get from others. And after interviewing over 100 women who had undergone cosmetic surgery for my book, Sex, Lies and Cosmetic Surgery, did I have stories to tell!

Check it out

@http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/30/fashion/30plastic.html?_r=2&ref=fashion&oref=slogin&

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