Tag Archive | “aging hands”

Summertime & the Living is Easy, but . . . by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Summertime & the living is easy, but what you don’t know CAN hurt you!

A sun-kissed bronze tan looks great, but it results in skin damage: wrinkles, brown skin discolorations, dull-looking skin, and potentially even skin cancer.

If you want healthy, younger-looking skin, and who doesn’t, you must practice good sun sense; because without it no other skin care product will matter.

The Sun Sense Essentials

      There is no such thing as a safe tan. Whether it is from the sun or a tanning bed the

result is still damaging.

*        UVB rays from the sun cause sunburn.

*        The primary cause of skin cancer is UVA rays from the sun. They also cause wrinkles and a weakened immune system. Because you don’t feel them they are called the “silent killers.”  UVA rays even penetrate through clear glass windows that do not have a UV coating.

*        Your skin is in jeopardy of being damaged even on a cloudy or hazy day since all the sun’s rays are present.

*       Sitting in the shade or wearing a hat only protects against a portion of the sun’s rays.

*        Your skin gets a double dose of exposure from surrounding surfaces such as water, sand, cement, and grass because they reflect the rays from the ground to your skin.

*        Altitude is a sun enhancer:  For every 1,000-foot increase in altitude, the sun’s potency increases by 4%.

*       A product’s SPF (Sun Protection Factor) number is a basic indicator of how long you can stay in the sun before getting burned.

*        While SPF is important, it’s only a measurement of sunburn (UVB) protection. You also need to protect your skin from the sun’s UVA rays as well.  Make sure your sunscreen contains the active ingredients that provide the necessary UVA protection. The active ingredients to look for are either zinc oxide or titanium dioxide,
avobenzone (may also be listed as butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane), Mexoryl SX (ecamsule), or Tinosorb.

*        Even if you’re using a sunscreen with an SPF 50 or greater, it still has limitations and can let approximately 3% of UV rays penetrate your skin.

*       No sunscreen provides 100% protection. So sitting directly in the sun, even with sunscreen on, is unwise.

*       For best results, apply sunscreen at least 15 to 20 minutes before sun exposure.

*       Apply sunscreen generously.

*        Re-apply after swimming.

*        Layering sunscreen products is beneficial. While the two sunscreens do not add up to one SPF number, you are getting more protection than just using one product.

*       Sunscreens that only use titanium dioxide and zinc oxide as the active ingredient are completely non-irritating and are best for sensitive skin, those with rosacea, or for use on babies and children.

*       Any part of your body exposed to the sun, such as your hands, neck, ears, and chest, must be protected. Aging skin on your body is no different than your face. The best way to prevent sun damage is the daily use of sunscreen.

It’s up to you to protect your youthful good looks, so learn more about what the sun is doing to your skin and how you can prevent it.

Madeleine Arena

www.tscsource.com

madeleine@tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the chapter on skin care which appears in the book,

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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Hand Lifts and Other New Cosmetic Surgery Trends

The “hand lift” might be the hottest new trend in plastic surgery, and if so, you can blame it on selfies! Some camera-conscious women are getting Juvederm injections to smooth out their hands to show off close-ups of their engagement rings. For a temporary fix to plump up or smooth out their skin, or disguise surface veins, they are willing to fork over up to $1,300 for this 5-10 minutes procedure. But hand lifts are hardly the strangest new cosmetic surgery procedure on the menu. Here are seven other plastic surgery trends that might just leave your jaw agape.
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WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT THOSE AGING HANDS?

We’ve all seen it before, a young face, with old looking hands – the dead give away to a person’s age. The tell tale signs: wrinkled skin, brown spots, protruding veins, tendons and bones . . . An aging appearance is no longer measured just by facial lines and furrows, sagging jowls or waddle necks. As the public becomes more tuned to aesthetics, the appearance of the upper surface of one’s hands increasingly comes into play.

Why the Years Are Unkind to Our Hands

As we age, the fatty layer of our hands gradually thins. Our hands lose volume, fat and elasticity. As a result, the skin becomes more translucent and wrinkled, causing underlying structures as bones and veins to become more apparent. The elements of sun, wind and rain also are unkind to our hands. Hands constantly exposed to the sun develop brown spots. The drying effects of the elements cause further skin wrinkles.

 What’s a Person to Do?

Many surgical and non-surgical treatments are available to rejuvenate both facial and body features. What solutions can science offer us for aging hands? Let’s start with the basics.

Protect your hands from the elements by wearing gloves during times of inclement weather.

Apply sunscreen, ideally SPF 50,  to your hands several times during the day. Remember, each time you wash your hand, you are also washing away the protective sunscreen. So carry a small size sunscreen in your purse and reapply it often.

Moisturize your hands as well as your face with a good quality moisturizer.

Get rid of age spots:

Prescriptive strength hydroquinone or Retin-A help erase signs of hyperpigmentation. If these products don’t do the trick, lasers would be the next step up in treatments.

Get rid of the translucent, shriveled appearance of the skin on the top of your hands:

Dermal fillers  – synthetic ones such as Radiesse, Juvederm or Perlane or non-synthetic ones and non-synthetic ones as the patient’s own fat – are one viable solution. Injected under the first layer of the skin to plump it up in a 5-to-10-minute procedure, fillers work very well, but must be repeated as their effects diminish over time. A second solution is energy driven devices as intense pulsed light, Fraxel or CO2 laser resurfacing.

What about surgical hand lifts?

Can excess skin be surgically removed? Not anytime soon. For one thing, hand surgery is likely to causes obvious scarring. Secondly, hands pose a greater risk of complications. And beautiful hands would be a poor trade off for hands that don’t function as they should. In an earlier article I wrote about Madonna’s Eyes – how young and beautiful they appear.  But have you noticed that she often wears fingerless gloves during her performances – most likely to hide her less-than-young-looking hands?

Can’t science do something more for aging hands? Not at the moment, but never say “Never”.  Advances in cosmetic surgery are driven by demand, and hand rejuvenation is a hot new topic.

Beauty Within

                Beauty Without . . .

                               What’s Your Passion?

Click to Explore the Many Dimensions of Beauty 

Lois W. Stern

GIVE YOUR HANDS A LIFT!

Give your Hands a Lift

The dead give away – A person with a young face, but veiny, wrinkled or spotted hands. 

 As we age, the fatty layer of our hands gradually diminishes. As a result, the skin becomes more translucent and wrinkled, and underlying structures as bones and veins become more apparent. As if this weren’t enough punishment, since hands are constantly exposed to the sun, brown spots often appear.

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An aging appearance is no longer measured just by crow’s feet and saggy jowls, but also by the appearance of the upper surface of one’s hands. Whereas a myriad of both surgical and non-surgical treatments are available and commonplace today to rejuvenate aging facial and body features, what solution does science offer us for aging hands?

Have you noticed how Madonna tends to camouflage her hands, by wearing fingerless gloves during many of her performances?

But what about hand lifts? Is science working on a solution for aging hands? One viable solution is dermal fillers – a 5-to-10-minute procedure where the surgeon injects synthetic fillers like Radiesse, Juvederm or Perlane or the patient’s own fat under the first layer of skin to plump it up. (Costs about $1,200). A second solution, is energy driven devices as intense pulsed light, Fraxel or CO2 laser resurfacing treatments (about $1,500) to remove sun spots and tighten the skin , or a combination of fillers and lasers. The effects of these treatments typically last about a year.

Is the surgical removal of excess skin a viable option? Probably not because it’s likely to causes obvious scarring. Furthermore there’s also a greater risk of complications as hands do not heal well. It would be quite a trick on nature to be left with beautiful, young looking hands that don’t function well. But since advances in cosmetic surgery are driven by demand, who knows what the future might bring! I’ve learned to never say “Never”!Beauty Within

               Beauty Within,

                                   Beauty Without . . .

                                            What’s Your Passion?

Click to Explore the Many Dimensions of Beauty