Tag Archive | author

CAN AUTHENTICITY AND COSMETIC SURGERY CO-EXIST?

Can authenticity and cosmetic surgery co-exist? Jane Fonda renews this conversation.

As a woman ages, “authentic” can mean several different things. To the feminist, the truly authentic woman is the one who just lets physical aging happen without a backward glance in the mirror. Others see “authentic” as being true to oneself, even in the face of negative societal judgments.

Most of us want to look our best and are willing to spend money to enhance our appearance. For some, this might mean coloring away gray hair, investing in porcelain veneers, getting facial treatments to beautify our skin. For others, cosmetic surgery answers the call. No matter the choice, many of us feel the conflict. We are torn between “Authenticity” and “Beauty”. It is not always easy to be true to oneself.

Why such inner conflict? I question how much women support one another as we each draw our own personal line between authenticity and beauty? To me, it means not being judgmental or telling this woman how you think she should have made that call. It means supporting her desire to look as good as she feels and appreciating her resolve to invest in herself. But I do believe there’s another side to authenticity – being true to oneself and avoiding glaringly inconsistent messages. To me this means taking ownership of your choice – not necessarily broadcasting it far and wide, but not being deceitful about it either. When Jane Fonda went on her recent book tour encouraging women to embrace their aging selves while admitting on prime time TV that she has undergone extensive work to defy the effects of her personal aging clock, many criticized that duality of perspective. But I didn’t see it that way.

Although I suspect the debate surrounding the co-existance of authenticity and cosmetic surgery is likely to continue to rage, I would like to shift gears to what I consider a more productive focus – a discussion on what it means to live one’s life being true to oneself.

Beauty Within

         Beauty Without . . .

                        What’s Your Passion?

Click to Explore the Many Dimensions of Beauty

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Hand Lifts and Other New Cosmetic Surgery Trends

The “hand lift” might be the hottest new trend in plastic surgery, and if so, you can blame it on selfies! Some camera-conscious women are getting Juvederm injections to smooth out their hands to show off close-ups of their engagement rings. For a temporary fix to plump up or smooth out their skin, or disguise surface veins, they are willing to fork over up to $1,300 for this 5-10 minutes procedure. But hand lifts are hardly the strangest new cosmetic surgery procedure on the menu. Here are seven other plastic surgery trends that might just leave your jaw agape.
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A New Look for Renee Zellweger – Plastic Surgery: Yes or NO?

So much in the news about 45-year-old Renee Zellweger of late, suddenly ushered in after her appearance at the recent 21st annual Elle Women in Hollywood Awards.

TMZ reported: Despite not appearing in a movie since 2010, Renee has definitely been working for the last few years … on her face.

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Is it really anyone else’s business? Well, in my case it became everyone’s business because I wrote a book about my experience. Was I self-conscious and a bit embarrassed? Sure. But I took the plunge and was glad I did. Sometimes honesty pays off.

All this banter abut Renee reminds me of an article titled “Hey, It’s Still Me in Here”, which appeared in the Sunday Style section of the NY Times some years back. I was quoted then about some of the positive and not-so-positive reactions I get from others. And after interviewing over 100 women who had undergone cosmetic surgery for my book, Sex, Lies and Cosmetic Surgery, did I have stories to tell!

Check it out

@http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/30/fashion/30plastic.html?_r=2&ref=fashion&oref=slogin&

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Beauty and Anti-Aging Tip – Wrinkles and Face Lifts – Do They Work Together

If you see a woman with a road map of wrinkles on her face, do you instantly think: “She’d look so pretty if only she’d get a facelift.” Well,maybe a facelift isn’t the best solution . . . unless of course, you admire that wind tunnel look!

In this video, noted plastic surgeon Dr. Robert Kotler, explains why, and tells what might be a better solution.

Watch it here.

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In Loving Memory of Joan Rivers – The Anti-Aging Queen

IN LOVING MEMORY OF JOAN RIVERS . . .

Let’s laugh together over some of Joan’s funniest lines about Cosmetic Surgery. After all, making people laugh was her passion! Joan had been there, done that, so many times and was an expert at pulling humor from her experiences. 

 

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Read nine of her funniest puns posted to the right of each of her photos.

  

YES, WE DO NOTICE WHEN YOU MAKE A CHANGE – EITHER LARGE OR SMALL – by Lillian Shah

Lillian Shah, fellow author and colleague, had sent me this letter some time ago. I thanked her and promptly filed it away. I just rediscovered it and thought it worth posting. Her book, Healthy by Keeping Track: A Complete Guide to Maintaining Your Own Medical Records is well worth the read.

Shortly after we were first married my husband had his upper wisdom teeth removed, under anesthetic.  Afterwards I drove him home as he was still a bit groggy.  While stopping at a red light I looked at him directly for the first time as he continued to describe his minor surgery.

I immediately interrupted him and asked, “What happened to your front tooth?”

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He had no idea what I was talking about.  “Nothing, why, what’s wrong with it?”  He pulled down the visor on his side and looked at his teeth.  “What is it?  What’s wrong?”

He continued to examine his teeth in the mirror as I resumed driving and continued to tell him, “Your front tooth!  On the right side!  Something’s missing.”

“Oh that,” he said.  I remember something about the doctor mentioning they had bumped my tooth.  It’s nothing.”  As I glanced over I could see he was rubbing the edge of his tooth with his tongue and his fingers, trying to fathom why I was so upset.”

When we got home I said, “Let me have a look,” and turned his head to the left, to the right, and touched the chipped edge with my finger.

It was, I know now, the smallest of small chips, but I was beside myself.  My husband was, and is, very handsome – think Omar Shariff – and I took great pleasure in that fact.  But so far as the case of the chipped front tooth he thought I was truly being silly.

I became more and more irrational about his face.  Although I hadn’t mentioned it to him, I had become convinced that his jaw line was significantly altered and that it was most certainly his surgeon’s fault.  I was even more upset about this than the chipped tooth.

Then we both began to notice something else altogether.  He would absent-mindedly tap his face, just above and a little to the left of his front tooth.  He continued to do it to such an extent that I asked him about it.  “Do you realize you’re tapping your face?”

“Yes,” he replied.  “It’s numb there and I seem to tap at it unconsciously.  I think they might have damaged a nerve when they did my wisdom teeth.”

“And there’s another thing!” I told him, as I couldn’t keep the change in his face contour to myself another second.

The following week my husband had his regular checkup with his dentist.  When he came home he reported that his dentist pronounced the wisdom teeth surgery a complete success and verified my husband’s analysis that a small nerve had indeed been damaged in the process.  He said he would stop noticing it over time and the face tapping would stop.  Then my husband gave me a big grin and asked, “Did you notice anything different?”

“Yes,” I said, “The chip is gone.  Did he put a filling there?”  “No, no,” my husband laughed.  “It was so tiny, he just smoothed it out.”  And on closer inspection, and after touching the tooth again, I realized it had indeed been very, very small, and now it’s absence was not at all noticeable – almost.

Actually it took me months to stop being aware of the changes.  As to the tapping, that also stopped along the way; I’ve long since forgotten when.  And Father Time has slowly but surely had his way with the contours of the very beloved face my husband still wears.

However, I think if it’s someone super dear to you, even the tiniest change can be quite disorienting. When my 50-year-old daughters walk in with a new clothing style or a completely different haircut (or even a slight change in color) I am always taken by surprise.

It is obviously the person we love – not their hair, their voice, their smile, their size, their shape, the way they move – but let there be the least alteration in just one of these aspects of their person and we can’t help but notice and react.

Lois, I think your book is a godsend.  Not everyone can be a great beauty and not many people even aspire to be.  But the miracle of plastic surgery is that it can help make us more comfortable, healthier – and more attractive, to ourselves and to others.  And we all know, that in extreme cases, it allows us to lead the lives we otherwise could not possibly have.

I know you encourage your readers, as they plan this very significant undertaking, to keep a little sympathy and understanding for those nearest and dearest who will need some time to comprehend that the person they love and treasure is still there, just in  slightly (or significantly) different package.

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Avoid Premature Skin Photo-Aging

car windowSunscreen is one very important protective device car manufacturers have forgotten. Sounds like a strange request? Well, did you know that you can get significant sun damage through the window glass in cars? Noted dermatologist, Dr. Neil Schultz explains the inherent dangers to drivers and passengers alike of both premature skin photo-aging and skin cancer. While all glass blocks the burning UVB rays, it still allows 60% of the damaging UVA rays through. Although usually the front windshield is laminated with adequate protection against UVA, not so with the other car windows. To protect yourself from the damaging sun’s rays streaming in through other windows, you need sunscreen with UVA protection whenever you are in your car. So it might be a good idea to keep some sunscreen handy in your glove compartment. And then, don’t forget to use it on yourself . . .  and your precious cargo.

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Lois W. Stern is the author of two books on physical beauty: Sex, Lies and Cosmetic Surgery and Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour as well as a growing series of Tales2Inspire books of inspiring short stories.

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