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Do you Really Need a SKINCARE ROUTINE? Part 2 by Madeleine Arena

Do you Really Need a SKINCARE ROUTINE? Part 2

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Madeleine Arena


The next three important steps in creating an effective skincare routine are to renew, to protect, and to prevent.

Your skin sheds billions of cells every day. However, sun damage, dry skin, oily skin, genetics or a variety of skin disorders can cause the skin’s natural shedding process to slow or stop. Adding an exfoliant as the third step in your regime can help renew your skin, making you look younger.

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For maximum efficacy of steps four (protect) and five (prevent) you’ll need to add products formulated with ingredients that protect from UVA and UVB sun rays, reinforce and maintain the skin’s structure, and restore damaged cells to normal function.

Choose products that contain ingredients from these four essential groups:

1. Broad Spectrum Sunscreens

It’s critical that your daytime moisturizer contain these active ingredients, which will differentiate it from your nighttime moisturizer. The single most important step you can take to prevent pre-mature aging, not to mention preventing skin cancer, is to wear a broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF rating of at least 30. Broad spectrum means that you’re protected from both UVB (burning rays) and UVA (aging rays). Look for these active sunscreen ingredients to ensure you’re getting sufficient UVA protection: Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, Avobenzone, or Tinosorb.

2. Antioxidants

Antioxidants help your skin heal, produce healthy collagen, resist the harmful effects of the environment, reduce inflammation and free radical damage. These ingredients include: various forms of vitamins A, C, and E; Co Enzyme Q-10; superoxide dismutase; glutathione; green tea and grape seed extracts, to name a few. While it’s not always true, in this case, if a little is good, a lot is definitely better, so look for a product that’s rich in these ingredients.

3. Skin-Identical Ingredients

Improve skin texture, retain water, protect from the environment, fight infection, and help repair and maintain the skin’s outer and inner barrier structure. Choose a product that contains some of these ingredients: ceramides, lecithin, glycerin, fatty acids, polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid, collagen, elastin, proteins, amino acids, cholesterol, and glycosaminoglycan.

4. Cell-Communicating Ingredients

Help prevent wrinkles by reducing cellular damage. Cell-communicating ingredients can tell a skin cell to look, act, and behave more like a normal, healthy intact skin cell would. This is a developing area of skin care. Look for products that contain these ingredients: niacinamide, retinol, synthetic peptides, lecithin, and adenosine triphosphate.

 Next month I’ll cover specialized treatments, as well as the specifics of a daily routine.

Madeleine@tscsource.com

http://www.tscsource.com



Madeleine is the author of the skin care chapter published in

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on our Lunch Hour

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Do you Really Need a SKINCARE ROUTINE? Part 1 by Madeleine Arena

Do you Really Need a SKINCARE ROUTINE? Part 1

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Madeleine Arena

Absolutely, yes!!! If you want great looking skin, (and who doesn’t?), you need to learn how to take care of it. The essential first step is to find out all about your skin type because different skin types need different formulations to address their individual needs. Once you know that, you’ll learn how to take care of your skin.

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You’ve probably noticed how your skin changes with the weather and the climate; not to mention the effects of stress. The basic categories of oily, dry, and combination skin don’t deal with the various other issues that impact skin type. Skin concerns such as rosacea, acne, and sun damage don’t fit these categories. Just to make your quest more challenging is the realization that you can have more than one skin type: sensitive and oily, sun damaged with acne, oily and blemish-prone. Knowing all you can about what affects your skin type will enable you to choose the right products.

Combining products into an effective skincare regimen can be a daunting task. Choices abound and range from simple to complex. Since both have advantages and disadvantages, it’s essential that you learn about all the product and treatment options before choosing the elements of the skin care routine that’s best for you. Fancy, expensive products are not in and or themselves the answer.

The goal – find the skincare routine that works for you.

Cleansing, preparing and replenishing the skin are the critical first two steps in an effective skincare routine. The following chart details what the cleanser and toner do, why you need them, and the benefits you can expect from using them.

Look for the March issue and the next three important steps – renew, protect, and prevent – in an effective skincare routine.

Madeleine@tscsource.com                www.tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the skin care chapter published in

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on our Lunch Hour

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BUY HERE.



 

WHY is YOUR SKIN’S BARRIER SUCH A BIG DEAL? by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*


WHY IS YOUR SKIN’S BARRIER SUCH A BIG DEAL?

If you’ve read through a beauty magazine or visited any skincare websites, you’ve undoubtedly seen more than a few references to your skin’s barrier. There’s been a lot of talk about it lately, as well as an array of new products claiming to repair it. Why has it become such a big deal? Because it is a big deal. Your skin’s health depends on how your skin barrier functions.

What is the skin’s barrier?

Your skin barrier includes the outermost layers of skin – the surface, which when healthy looks and feels smooth, soft and plump – like a baby’s skin. On the other hand, the surface of damaged skin looks dry, rough, dull, and dehydrated.

Cracked-Skin-Profile for Dec 2015 Newsletter

How your barrier functions is essential. Why? Because if it’s damaged, repairing issues like wrinkles, post-acne red marks, dry skin, extra-sensitive skin, and breakouts will be virtually impossible.

Research reported by the National Rosacea Society suggests that an impaired barrier function could contribute to the acute sensitivity rosacea suffers experience when they’re exposed to irritants.   Therefore, demonstrating how important it is to have a barrier that’s healthy and functioning at its best.

What damages the skin’s barrier?

It’s always better to be pro-active rather than to be reactive. Being pro-active will help you maintain your skin’s barrier function. Preventing damage can go a long way to ensuring your barrier remains healthy. Here are some ways to do that:

•    Use warm water rather than water that is too hot or too cold since both are irritating to the skin.

•    While many of us love to soak in a luxurious bath, avoid soaking in water until skin “prunes” (pruning is a sign of barrier damage).

•    Stop using harsh scrubs or over-scrubbing, which can tear the skin’s surface.

•    Don’t use drying cleansers, including soap, which remove essential moisturizing substances from the skin.

•    Avoid skincare products that contain irritating ingredients.

•    Use products containing high amounts of bio-active ingredients like AHA, BHA, retinol, or anti-acne medications cautiously – even if this means you don’t use the product daily.

•    Always use sun protection – SPF 30 or greater. Unprotected sun exposure can cause a variety of skin damage, as well as immune system impairment.

How to repair a damaged barrier?

Dec 2015 Skin Barrier Face 2

To fix a skin barrier that is already damaged – or to prevent it from becoming that way – it’s critical to use skincare products that will give your skin the nutrients it needs to heal. To ensure that you’re using effective products read the labels and pay close attention to the ingredients in each product in your skincare routine. Healthy skin contains a variety of skin-identical or skin-repairing ingredients. A few ingredients to look for are essential fatty acids, cholesterol, ceramides, hyaluronic acid, and glycerin. Choose products that are pH-balanced – a pH that is too high (anything above 7) can dry out the skin. Do not use fragranced skincare, since fragrance is a problem for everyone’s skin.

Remember unprotected exposure to the sun is one of the leading causes of impaired barrier function. So, be safe – wear an anti-oxidant rich sunscreen rated at least SPF 30 or greater every day.

There’s no need to despair if dry skin is a problem.  Adding these steps to your skin care routine will help you can achieve smoother, softer, and even younger-looking skin.

 



* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label skin and hair care products for the trade. Madeleine can be reached through her website – www.tscsource.com

Write to Madeleine at: madeleine@tscsource.com

Use the form below to send questions to Madeleine.



 



 

Seriously, Can a “Face Lift” Really Be In a Jar?

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

There are many products on the market that claim to lift and firm the skin, even when it’s crepey. Claims such as, “face-lift in a jar”, are almost always misleading. While some of these firming creams do have value for skin, for the most part, their promises go beyond the scope of what’s possible from any skin-care product.

In reality, no firming or tightening products will give you results that are remotely similar to what you get from any medical procedures including fillers, lasers, or cosmetic surgery. It’s important to know the truth about firming creams. They’re expensive, the results are temporary; and who wants to waste money?

Skin Firming Facts

  1. Elastin is the fiber that allows the skin to “bounce” back into place. The skin begins to sag when the elastin fibers are damaged. Combine this sagging with sun damage and the skin becomes like crepe paper.
  2. Elastin production in the skin diminishes as we age. It produces less and less until it makes almost none at all.
  3. Sun damage and the natural aging process degrades elastin fibers. Even with medical procedures, it is almost impossible for adult skin to make more elastin.
  4. Most firming creams don’t contain ingredients that can firm or tighten (lift) skin.
  5. Skin-care products containing collagen or elastin cannot help rebuild or reinforce these structures in your skin. The molecular size of both collagen and elastin are too large to penetrate the skin’s surface. So the collagen and elastin in these products cannot fuse with the collagen and elastin in your skin.
  6. Some products on the market claim that the collagen and elastin they contain are “micronized”. That means that the molecules are small enough to be absorbed into the skin. However, even if they are nano-sized, these ingredients still will not merge with the collagen and elastin in your skin.
  7. For the most part, products claiming to tighten crepey skin contain ingredients called film-forming agents. These film forming ingredients actually form a film on the skin that can make the skin “feel” tighter. The effect is temporary. The sagging skin will not be noticeably lifted.
  8. hope_in_a_jar

Strategies to Firm and Tighten Skin

1. While collagen doesn’t help crepey skin bounce back, it does help support skin structure so that sagging is less apparent. The idea then is to build more collagen.  To do this, use skin care products that contain potent antioxidants and skin-repairing ingredients.

2. Daily sun protection with an SPF 30 sun protection product is critical. Sun damage destroys elastin and collagen fibers. Remember your face doesn’t stop at your chin so apply sunscreen to your neck as well as to your face.

3. Exfoliating daily with either a salicylic acid (BHA) or glycolic acid (AHA)  product has been proven to help improve skin texture. In addition to smoothing skin, research has also proven that these ingredients build more collagen and, may also help firm the skin. There’s no need to use both; one or the other is fine. However, alternating them also is an effective strategy.

4. Topically applied Vitamin A, also called retinol, can help improve the shape of the elastin. Research has shown that it builds more collagen, and may also help build elastin. Applying prescription retinoids such as Renova, or a retinol product every night can help a lot.

5. Medical interventions such as lasers and other light therapies such as Fraxel or Ulthera have demonstrated remarkable skin-firming results. They have also improved crepey skin.

6.    It’s time to consider cosmetic surgery when you’ve tried everything, and you’re not getting the results you want. There is a variety of face-lift procedures that can make a dramatic difference without making you looked “pulled too tight.”  It’s essential to combine these procedures with an effective skin-care routine to maximize your end results.

Be cautious of “miracle” products. Skin care products that seem “too good to be true” probably are. Research products before you buy them. Before making a skin care product purchase, research the product and its ingredients.  If there are ingredients that are unfamiliar, look them up to find out how they work.

Sources: Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, September 2012, pages 1036–1040; Birth Defects Research, September 2012, pages 248–257; International Journal of Cosmetic Science, April 2012, pages 132–139, and February 2011, pages 62–69; Biomacromolecules, February 2012, pages 379–386; Journal of Cosmetic Science, March 2010, pages 125–132; Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, March 2009, pages 56–62; Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, volume 20, 2006, page 980; and Experimental Dermatology, volume 11, 2002, page 398.


* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops private label skin and hair care products for the trade. Madeleine can be reached through her website – www.tscsource.com

Madeleine@tscsource.com

Use the form below to send questions to Madeleine.



 

CAN AUTHENTICITY AND COSMETIC SURGERY CO-EXIST?

Can authenticity and cosmetic surgery co-exist? Jane Fonda renews this conversation.

As a woman ages, “authentic” can mean several different things. To the feminist, the truly authentic woman is the one who just lets physical aging happen without a backward glance in the mirror. Others see “authentic” as being true to oneself, even in the face of negative societal judgments.

Most of us want to look our best and are willing to spend money to enhance our appearance. For some, this might mean coloring away gray hair, investing in porcelain veneers, getting facial treatments to beautify our skin. For others, cosmetic surgery answers the call. No matter the choice, many of us feel the conflict. We are torn between “Authenticity” and “Beauty”. It is not always easy to be true to oneself.

Why such inner conflict? I question how much women support one another as we each draw our own personal line between authenticity and beauty? To me, it means not being judgmental or telling this woman how you think she should have made that call. It means supporting her desire to look as good as she feels and appreciating her resolve to invest in herself. But I do believe there’s another side to authenticity – being true to oneself and avoiding glaringly inconsistent messages. To me this means taking ownership of your choice – not necessarily broadcasting it far and wide, but not being deceitful about it either. When Jane Fonda went on her recent book tour encouraging women to embrace their aging selves while admitting on prime time TV that she has undergone extensive work to defy the effects of her personal aging clock, many criticized that duality of perspective. But I didn’t see it that way.

Although I suspect the debate surrounding the co-existance of authenticity and cosmetic surgery is likely to continue to rage, I would like to shift gears to what I consider a more productive focus – a discussion on what it means to live one’s life being true to oneself.

Beauty Within

         Beauty Without . . .

                        What’s Your Passion?

Click to Explore the Many Dimensions of Beauty

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Summertime & the Living is Easy, but . . . by Madeleine Arena

THE SKIN CARE ARENA

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by Madeleine Arena, B.S., M.B.A.*

Summertime & the living is easy, but what you don’t know CAN hurt you!

A sun-kissed bronze tan looks great, but it results in skin damage: wrinkles, brown skin discolorations, dull-looking skin, and potentially even skin cancer.

If you want healthy, younger-looking skin, and who doesn’t, you must practice good sun sense; because without it no other skin care product will matter.

The Sun Sense Essentials

      There is no such thing as a safe tan. Whether it is from the sun or a tanning bed the

result is still damaging.

*        UVB rays from the sun cause sunburn.

*        The primary cause of skin cancer is UVA rays from the sun. They also cause wrinkles and a weakened immune system. Because you don’t feel them they are called the “silent killers.”  UVA rays even penetrate through clear glass windows that do not have a UV coating.

*        Your skin is in jeopardy of being damaged even on a cloudy or hazy day since all the sun’s rays are present.

*       Sitting in the shade or wearing a hat only protects against a portion of the sun’s rays.

*        Your skin gets a double dose of exposure from surrounding surfaces such as water, sand, cement, and grass because they reflect the rays from the ground to your skin.

*        Altitude is a sun enhancer:  For every 1,000-foot increase in altitude, the sun’s potency increases by 4%.

*       A product’s SPF (Sun Protection Factor) number is a basic indicator of how long you can stay in the sun before getting burned.

*        While SPF is important, it’s only a measurement of sunburn (UVB) protection. You also need to protect your skin from the sun’s UVA rays as well.  Make sure your sunscreen contains the active ingredients that provide the necessary UVA protection. The active ingredients to look for are either zinc oxide or titanium dioxide,
avobenzone (may also be listed as butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane), Mexoryl SX (ecamsule), or Tinosorb.

*        Even if you’re using a sunscreen with an SPF 50 or greater, it still has limitations and can let approximately 3% of UV rays penetrate your skin.

*       No sunscreen provides 100% protection. So sitting directly in the sun, even with sunscreen on, is unwise.

*       For best results, apply sunscreen at least 15 to 20 minutes before sun exposure.

*       Apply sunscreen generously.

*        Re-apply after swimming.

*        Layering sunscreen products is beneficial. While the two sunscreens do not add up to one SPF number, you are getting more protection than just using one product.

*       Sunscreens that only use titanium dioxide and zinc oxide as the active ingredient are completely non-irritating and are best for sensitive skin, those with rosacea, or for use on babies and children.

*       Any part of your body exposed to the sun, such as your hands, neck, ears, and chest, must be protected. Aging skin on your body is no different than your face. The best way to prevent sun damage is the daily use of sunscreen.

It’s up to you to protect your youthful good looks, so learn more about what the sun is doing to your skin and how you can prevent it.

Madeleine Arena

www.tscsource.com

madeleine@tscsource.com


Madeleine is the author of the chapter on skin care which appears in the book,

Tick Tock, Stop the Clock ~ Getting Pretty on Your Lunch Hour

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Natural Beauty Tips for Hair From Grandma’s Kitchen 

After cruising the aisles of the drugstore, don’t forget the kitchen. It is a beauty counter unto itself.

For more beautiful hair:

Although mayonnaise is  often-recommended for conditioning hair, many prefer Olive oil. Heat some extra virgin olive oil in the microwave for 10 seconds and apply to DRY hair. Leave it on for about 10 minutes, then shampoo so you are not left smelling like a salad.

Flat beer. Be sure to use beer that has lost its zing, or else heat fresh beer and allow it to cool. Wash your hair, pour it on, and comb. I guarantee it will not smell after it dries.

37th AFI Life Achievement Award - ArrivalsVinegar is a marvelous rinse. Cider vinegar is good for brunettes, white vinegar for blondes. Add four tablespoons to 16 – 20 ounces of warm water. Then use lots of cool water to remove the salady smell.

Lemons are a blonde’s best friend! The juice of two lemons in two glasses of lukewarm water should do it. If your hair does not tend to be dry, you can skip the rinse and let the sun add some highlights.

Sometimes, those products stored in your kitchen cabinets can do wonders for your hair – and your pocketbook!

Would you like to receive my free booklet “Make-up Do’s and Don’t For Women of a Certain Age?

Just click here.

Hand Lifts and Other New Cosmetic Surgery Trends

The “hand lift” might be the hottest new trend in plastic surgery, and if so, you can blame it on selfies! Some camera-conscious women are getting Juvederm injections to smooth out their hands to show off close-ups of their engagement rings. For a temporary fix to plump up or smooth out their skin, or disguise surface veins, they are willing to fork over up to $1,300 for this 5-10 minutes procedure. But hand lifts are hardly the strangest new cosmetic surgery procedure on the menu. Here are seven other plastic surgery trends that might just leave your jaw agape.
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Anti-Aging and Your Hands by Madeleine Arena

TURNING BACK THE HANDS OF TIME

From the Skin Care Arena

Your hands, like your face, greet the world. You shake hands to introduce yourself, or greet someone. You use your hands to express your affection to those you love; to soothe a sad child, or comfort someone suffering from an illness. If you’re like me, you may even “talk” with your hands.

Hands are the workhorses of the body. They are exposed to sunlight, extreme temperatures, and a lot of wear and tear, says Nelson Lee Novick, a clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, in New York City.

By the time you reach age thirty, skin-cell production decreases by ten percent, making your skin less able to repair itself. Unlike the thicker skinned, palms of the hand, the thin skin on the tops of the hands, can show signs of age first. In addition, when hands lose plumpness, due to the breakdown of collagen and elastin, veins and knuckles can start to look more prominent.

You can do things every day to help your hands look and feel good. The best regime for the hands is fairly simple. Just follow my five step plan.

Step one: Wash your hands the right way. The frequent washing that’s designed to keep your hands sanitary can also keep them dry, cracked and wrinkled.  The goal is to remove germs and grime, without stripping all the natural oils from your hands. So, wash with warm water instead of hot.

Step two: Avoid using harsh soaps. Dermatologists recommend nondrying products like Dove, or Neutrogena, as well as liquid nonsoap cleansers like Cetaphil. According to the Mayo Clinic, antibacterial soaps aren’t necessary and may even dry skin more. They also can kill good bacteria on the hands and encourage bad bacteria that resist antibiotics.

Step three: Rinse hands well, and gently pat or blot dry. Don’t rub.

Step Four: Apply moisturizer after washing your hands.  A good moisturizer can help prevent or treat dry skin on your hands.  It helps  retain moisture in the outer layer of skin, making your hands smoother and softer.  Two of my favorites are Eucerin Intensive Repair Extra Enriched Hand Cream, and Avon’s Moisture Therapy.  Apply it each time you wash your hands. Don’t forget to massage the cream into your fingernails & cuticles.

Step Five: Protect your hands from harsh cleaners by wearing gloves for your household chores. If you think about it there’s no use being careful about the soap you use to wash your hands if you’re also exposing your hands to harsh cleaners. You might also consider using an inexpensive pair of cotton gloves as a liner to prevent sweating and itching. These gloves are available at most drugstores. They can also be used at night to cover your hands after you’ve moisturized them.

Step Six: Last but definitely not least, make sure you use a sunscreen on your hands during the day. The backs of hands, especially, need protection.  There are quite a few products on the market. Try Boots No7 Protect & Perfect Hand Cream SPF 15, which you can pick up at Target for about $14.  Another excellent product is Resist Ultimate Anti-Aging Hand Cream SPF 30 for about $13 from Paula’s Choice Skincare. If possible, reapply every time you wash your hands.

* Madeleine Arena is a cosmetic chemist who develops  private label skin and hair care products for the trade. 

Click here to visit her beautiful new website.



 

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What’s This? New Barbie Dolls with Cellulite, Stretch Marks and Acne

New editions of the Barbie doll have the body of an average American woman — with skin that will also look something like “normal,” and an add-on pack that will allow kids to give their dolls acne, cellulite, stretch marks and more.

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The Lammily dolls, designed by artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm, are scaled to the measurements of the average 19-year-old woman, after becoming frustrated at how unrealistic Barbie’s proportions are. His goal was to create a fun, appealing doll with natural-looking makeup and a casual, sporty wardrobe.

The dolls are now available for purchase, and buyers can pre-order an exciting extra — a sticker package allowing kids to add removable “marks” to their dolls, ranging from artistic tattoos to cellulite and stretch marks to grass stains and scars.

It remains to be seen how many will order those “exciting” extras. Be honest, how many of you would opt for Cellulite, stretch marks or acne if given a choice.

Learn more at: Huffington Post.