Tag Archive | plastic surgery

CAN AUTHENTICITY AND COSMETIC SURGERY CO-EXIST?

Can authenticity and cosmetic surgery co-exist? Jane Fonda renews this conversation.

As a woman ages, “authentic” can mean several different things. To the feminist, the truly authentic woman is the one who just lets physical aging happen without a backward glance in the mirror. Others see “authentic” as being true to oneself, even in the face of negative societal judgments.

Most of us want to look our best and are willing to spend money to enhance our appearance. For some, this might mean coloring away gray hair, investing in porcelain veneers, getting facial treatments to beautify our skin. For others, cosmetic surgery answers the call. No matter the choice, many of us feel the conflict. We are torn between “Authenticity” and “Beauty”. It is not always easy to be true to oneself.

Why such inner conflict? I question how much women support one another as we each draw our own personal line between authenticity and beauty? To me, it means not being judgmental or telling this woman how you think she should have made that call. It means supporting her desire to look as good as she feels and appreciating her resolve to invest in herself. But I do believe there’s another side to authenticity – being true to oneself and avoiding glaringly inconsistent messages. To me this means taking ownership of your choice – not necessarily broadcasting it far and wide, but not being deceitful about it either. When Jane Fonda went on her recent book tour encouraging women to embrace their aging selves while admitting on prime time TV that she has undergone extensive work to defy the effects of her personal aging clock, many criticized that duality of perspective. But I didn’t see it that way.

Although I suspect the debate surrounding the co-existance of authenticity and cosmetic surgery is likely to continue to rage, I would like to shift gears to what I consider a more productive focus – a discussion on what it means to live one’s life being true to oneself.

Beauty Within

         Beauty Without . . .

                        What’s Your Passion?

Click to Explore the Many Dimensions of Beauty

slcs_cover_gold_med

Buy here.

Getting Over Getting Under by Dr. Barry Friedberg

Five reasons why Dr. Barry Friedberg, a 36-year private practice, Board certified anesthesiologist and the founder and president of the 501c3, non-profit Goldilocks Anesthesia Foundation wrote Getting Over Going Under, 5 things you MUST know before anesthesia

Let no one ever kid you, being an advocate for change, especially in anesthesia, is about the most difficult task one could ever attempt to shoulder.

Hercules

     Hercules should have had it so easy.

 

 

In 1992-3, after seeing my first 50 cases of propofol ketamine (PK) sedation emerge without PONV or need for postoperative opioids, I felt much like Archimedes, “Eureka. I’ve found it.” PK numerical reproducibility was established with the addition of BIS/EMG monitoring in 1998.

I have published 5 peer reviewed papers, 15 letters to the editor in Outpatient Surgeon Magazine, more letters to the editor in Anesthesia & Analgesia, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation, Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, & Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, a landmark textbook ‘Anesthesia In Cosmetic Surgery,’ and 51 lectures in the US, Canada, Mexico, Dominican Republic, Israel, Malaysia & Singapore.

Many people publish papers. However, half of all published papers are never subsequently referenced. My papers have been subsequently referenced in 144 papers and in 50 textbooks.

Despite my Herculean effort to change the minds of my fellow dedicated anesthesia providers (DAPs), the subjects of postoperative pain management and PONV continue to appear in the literature as if the solution had yet to be discovered (or worse if my efforts had never occurred.)

As Aspect’s Dr. Paul Manberg often opined, ‘Change is glacial.’ When presented with my thoughts about getting better patient outcomes, most of my colleagues attitudes were essentially, ‘We’re not killing anyone, why should we change?’ Somewhere Semmelweis’ corpse is turning over in his grave.

Actually, as Li reported in 2009 Anesthesiology (110, 759-765), we are killing one American patient every day from anesthesia over medication, the natural result of not directly measuring anesthetic effect on the cerebral cortex. Even more saddening was that the editors of Anesthesiology did not deem this mortality study worthy of being an article of special interest.

Part of the human condition is that all people regardless of their profession resist change. Physicians as a sub-set are notoriously resistant to change. DAPs as a sub-set of physicians are virtually impossible to change. Unless presented with this simple paradigm in training, most DAPs will not even consider the notion of a differing paradigm.

The DAP syllogism goes like, ‘All surgery is painful. Opioids (narcotics) are painkillers. Therefore, all surgery requires the judicious use of some opioids.’ Having successfully practiced for the past 16 years without intra- or postoperative opioids, I would beg to differ.

Postoperative pain is a function of intra-operative pain.

Only by midbrain NMDA saturation prior to incision (or injection) does one avoid entrance of pain signals to the brain. NMDA saturation is accomplished in 98-99% of patients with a 50 mg dose of intravenous ketamine 3 minutes prior to stimulation. Hallucination free use of ketamine is accomplished by incrementally titrating propofol to BIS <75 with baseline EMG; i.e. tinyurl.com/n98x86k

Instead of being frustrated with my apparent inability to produce change in my fellow DAPs’ intra-operative conduct, I considered using the same paradigm for change that got fathers in the delivery rooms for the births of their children; i.e. public knowledge leading to public demand.

What are the 5 reasons I wrote ‘Getting Over Going Under, 5 things you MUST know before anesthesia?’

Reason #1: How can a pre-surgery patient know to ask for the best available technology, a brain monitor, if they do not even know that such as thing exists?

Reason #2: Why would they ask for one without the knowledge that over medication can lead to delirium, dementia and even death, especially in those over 50?

Reason #3: Why would the general public not assume they would receive the best available technology for their anesthesia care, especially if it might improve their chance of waking up without brain fog?

Reason #4: Why does PONV still exist and is there is an established way to avoid it?

Reason #5: Why does postoperative pain still exist and is there an established way to avoid it?

The answers to these reasons are easily digested in his 2010 book for which a free Kindle giveaway this summer was very successful and another is planned for this fall.

All proceeds from the sale of this book support the education message of Dr. Friedberg’s non-profit Goldilocks Anesthesia Foundation, “No major surgery under anesthesia without a brain monitor.”

GOGU_cvr_hires

For further information, contact Dr. Friedberg @drfriedberg@drfriedberg.com

In Loving Memory of Joan Rivers – The Anti-Aging Queen

IN LOVING MEMORY OF JOAN RIVERS . . .

Let’s laugh together over some of Joan’s funniest lines about Cosmetic Surgery. After all, making people laugh was her passion! Joan had been there, done that, so many times and was an expert at pulling humor from her experiences. 

 

Joan r.

Click here

Read nine of her funniest puns posted to the right of each of her photos.

  

A NEW SMARTPHONE APP FOR BEAUTY – by Lois W. Stern

Plastic_Surgery_App

Here is a  cosmetic surgery visualization app for the iPhone which allows users to upload a photo, then manipulate it to see how they might look after their preferred cosmetic surgery procedure. This app, designed by BodyPlastika, simulates the results of a range of facial and body contouring procedures, such as rhinoplasty, liposuction, breast augmentation and lip augmentation, to name a few. It gives a general idea of how results might appear.

This app was created to be a more convenient way of envisioning plastic surgery results, although it should be noted that they are approximate.

Does it take the place of a face-to-face cosmetic surgery consultation? Absolutely not! But it might just give the ‘thinking-about-cosmetic-surgery’ prospective patient some points for discussion before starting that round of consultations.

To read Lois’s article: The Cosmetic Surgery Consultation – A Two-Way Street,

click here

BodyPlastika, a cosmetic surgery app designed by Think Basis, has been named one of the top ten apps by Healthcare Global.

AGELESS BEAUTY – GETTING A LITTLE WORK DONE . . .

Autumn is just around the corner – the time women begin to seriously consider (or reconsider)  “Getting s little work done”.  With this professional courtesy offer, you can purchase copies @ $8.95 while supplies last – and at this price they are going to go fast!. 

slcs_cover_gold_med

Your order will include 12 copies of Sex, Lies and Cosmetic Surgery plus a FREE 5.5 X 8 inch laminated sign to post in your office. 

Learn more about this award winning book at: www.sexliesandcosmeticsurgery.com. Read the reviews – even written up in the Style section of the NYTimes.

 Want to offer patients some great encouragement and calming advice coming from over 100 women who have been there, done that? Sex, Lies and Cosmetic Surgery has received glowing reviews from several top board certified plastic surgeons, read and endorsed by three members of the ASPS before being placed in first position on their online bookstore (until their bookstore feature was removed from their website.) 

 

Click here to  place your secure order.

And here is a picture of the laminated sign that will be included with your order.

buy_now_poster

ANOTHER COSMETIC SURGERY HORROR STORY IN THE NEWS

I’m not opposed to cosmetic surgery. Not at all. Those who know me, know that I think it can be a pretty wonderful experience. But today’s headline in the Daily News; Hack plastic surgeon . . .  faces murder rap for performing liposuction on heart transplant patient made my skin crawl just a little.

 I wondered if this was a scare tactic, or if it was as bad as it sounded.  I had to find out so I read the full article. What I  discovered was that it was even worse than I had imagined. This plastic surgeon performed a cosmetic surgical procedure on a heart transplant patient without even consulting with her cardiologist. How could he even consider performing a non-essential surgical procedure on a woman with such a medical history? (I also wonder how that woman could have made such a foolish decision, but that’s a discussion for another day.)

I felt incensed! With all the competent, highly ethical plastic surgeons out there, doesn’t it make you wonder how this beautiful 51 year old woman fell into the hands of such an irresponsible one? I immediately went through my articles to find one I had written some time ago: How Do You Find the Surgeon Who Is Right For You.

So here is my plea to you today. If you are considering any type of cosmetic surgery, please do yourself a big favor and read this article first. It just might save your life!

knife

And if you want the details about this surgical horror story, you can read it here.

My Facebook author page is quite new, but gaining momentum quickly. I invite you to LIKE my page. And while you’re there, don’t miss the inspiring stories, my ‘Inner Beauty’ stories.

CLICK HERE.

You can also click on the word FOLLOW in the upper right corner of this blog to stay connected.

SOCIAL-MEDIA-DERIVED-VANITY FUELS COSMETIC SURGERY DESIRES

As women age, their friendly mirror often morphs into an unfriendly encounter. Remember the daily ritual of the wicked stepmother in the Snow White fairy tale? Mirror, mirror, on the wall. Who’s the fairest of them all? In the fairy tale version, the reality of her aging face drives one woman to the extreme of ordering the slaying of her competition – her beautiful, young step daughter.

Although few are so distraught over their aging appearance that they are driven to kill off the competition, the mirror often becomes a woman’s weapon of self-destruction as she ages. Here’s a common scenario. After many years of preening before her reflection, she awakens one morning to a startling reality. That image staring back at her looks so much more like her mother than her former self. Plastic surgery to the rescue.

Today the mirror takes a back seat to modern technology.

dermatologist_skin

Photoshopped faces set a new standard in beauty, making the flaws in non-image edited faces all the more self-evident. Now Facebook, video-chatting tools like Skype and FaceTime, iPhones and iPads are fueling the plastic surgery market. This new, social-media-derived vanity is driving plastic surgeons to cater to the technologically savvy consumer. Be prepared for a whole new jargon of minimally invasive procedure terms designed to make people appear more attractive during FaceTime conversations.

Are they long term improvements or simply quick fixes? Would some of the plastic surgeons out there weigh in on this conversation?

Click to LIKE

FACEBOOK LIKE

Lois W. Stern